The worst colleges in America

 

Posted by Ryan DeVito on 18 September 2018

Students are well-versed in college ranking lists. High-ranking colleges become more and more desirable, as lower-ranking colleges struggle to gain notoriety. What if, instead of looking at the best colleges, students learned more about the worst colleges to inform their decisions?

Check out this interesting article. The Daily Caller composed a list of America's worst colleges by "considering absolutely everything that matters." What matters? Return on investment, four year graduation rate, and social life rating are among the things that "matter." All things considered, Drexel University, the Philadelphia college known for its innovative co-op program, was ranked the worst college in America. Also among the top ten are Pace University (New York), SUNY Purchase (New York), and Seton Hall University (New Jersey). Further down the list are schools like University of Rhode Island and Hofstra University (New York).

Is this list valid? I say no, because each of the 32 schools on the list has definite merits. The list also seems to have a heavy bias against schools in the New York, Boston, and Chicago areas. My opinion is that there is a best and worst school for each individual student, but there is never a blanket "best" or "worst" school in the land. Many students thrive on Drexel's urban campus as they participate in hands-on internships. Similarly, students at SUNY Purchase love the school's close proximity to Manhattan, affordable tuition, and focus on the arts. Again, University of Rhode Island is often the perfect fit for students interested in marine studies or music. To label any school as "the worst" is misguided, at best. Students should never use lists are their primary reasoning for attending, or not attending, a college. A bad fit for one person could be a great fit for you.

What do you think of the "worst colleges" list? We would love to hear your thoughts below.

Comments

 
March 05 2016, 04:51
TheEnd
I came to Drexel for graduate school and it has singlehandedly destroyed my life. It was immediately clear that my department is simply an exploitative for-profit section of the school, willing to take take anyone's money and provide no education to the graduate students. I received a perfectly reasonable education at a state school, prior to coming here, with minimal debt. Now I have massive debt, zero no research experience, and a graduate degree I'm ashamed in. So I thought that list was strangely accurate.

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